LakeSandy

LAKE SANDY RYE:  Rye Lager

If you search old maps of Minneapolis prior to 1900 you may notice a large and shallow lake named Lake Sandy. This small lake is noted and located just west of Central Avenue along what is now St. Anthony Parkway. At one point in Minneapolis, this was the only lake in the cities park with an ice rink, warming house, and concession stand. Over the years, the lake has disappeared off of maps and can be hard to locate in our well-developed part of town.

DESCRIPTION:
A clean, crisp lager with a yellow hue. This beer is lightly hopped to bring out the pilsner and rye malts. It is refreshing enough for a hot summer day, yet bold enough to be enjoyed year round.It is brewed with 3 different malts and a single variety of hops.

Pairs well with: Bratwurst, Gruyere

ABV: 5.6%     IBU: 19     SRM: 5

56LogoTransparent

Over the years many have heard tales of Northeast lost lake but no one really knows how Sandy, the small lake just west of Central Avenue along what is now St. Anthony Parkway vanished.

Some say it was Theodore Wirth, Minneapolis’ park superintendent declaring in 1926 the 24 acre lake “Completely dry!” ordering it filled-in for “The good health of the community”.

Others speculate something altogether different.

Yes, Lake Sandy was indeed declared dry. But the lake was declared dry before it was dry then dried and drained! Other “slews” in the area suddenly turned into beautiful lakes!  You see, during prohibition, Lake Sandy was THE watering hole for those looking to wet their whistle with a frosty brew!  Although shallow & muddy, Lake Sandy was spring-fed, a perfect host for chilling barrels and barrels of illegal craft brews like the much sought after Muskie-Hole Rye stuck in the mud just below Sandy’s surface behind Shelly’s Bait & Tackle. There is rumor that Shelly and her daughter Ginger were the last freshwater mermaids in NE MPLS.

With her shores lined with such noted speakeasy’s known as The Jolly, Romano’s, Pulpit Bookshop and of course Shelly’s, known for their crisp, pale yellow hue lager, Lake Sandy was gaining notoriety to all parts of the state and sadly to the desk of prohibition sponsor Andrew Volstead and his temperance league.

Shelly’s Bait and Tackle is long gone and the lake is literally now a road map but you can once again enjoy the clean, crisp lager with a pale yellow hue from 56 brewing. In the brewery there is a map dated pre 1900 where you can still see where the large lake was, proof of her existence. Lightly hopped to bring out the pilsner and rye malts. Lake Sandy Rye is refreshing enough for a hot summer day, yet bold enough to be enjoyed year round.